The truth about JPM: Less is more

first_imgAdam’s Take @adamfeuerstein The truth about JPM: Less is more Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Log In | Learn More GET STARTED Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Adam Feuersteincenter_img By Adam Feuerstein Jan. 17, 2020 Reprints Alex Hogan/STAT About the Author Reprints SAN FRANCISCO — Yet another J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference is done. Was it worth it?All in all, this was a really pleasant week in San Francisco. The weather this year was an A-minus. There was a noticeable drop in attendance. Meeting rooms weren’t jam-packed. Ubers and Lyfts were easy to hail and coffee shops were bustling but not overloaded. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags biotechnology What’s included? [email protected] last_img read more

Landing Restriction Placed on Persons From Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone

first_imgLanding Restriction Placed on Persons From Guinea, Liberia and Sierra LeoneJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of National Security, the Hon. Peter Bunting. Landing Restriction Placed on Persons From Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone National SecurityOctober 16, 2014Written by: Ministry of National Security, Communications & Public Affairs RelatedNational Security Minister calls on Caribbean and Latin America to Face Ebola Threat with Militancy Story HighlightsThe Jamaican Government has issued an immediate travel ban against certain persons travelling directly or indirectly from or through Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, in light of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.This ban extends to persons ordinarily resident in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone as well as persons who have travelled to or transited through Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, within 28 days of having departed from these countries.The travel ban extends to Commonwealth citizens, not citizens of Jamaica, who have travelled to or transited through Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone within 28 days of their arrival to Jamaica. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail center_img RelatedPolice and Lotteries Commission Ramp Up Efforts to Tackle Illegal Gaming Related95 Students Receive Scholarships from Area 4 Police The Jamaican Government has issued an immediate travel ban against certain persons travelling directly or indirectly from or through Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, in light of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.This ban extends to persons ordinarily resident in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone as well as persons who have travelled to or transited through Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, within 28 days of having departed from these countries.The travel ban extends to Commonwealth citizens, not citizens of Jamaica, who have travelled to or transited through Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone within 28 days of their arrival to Jamaica.CARICOM nationals benefitting from the free movement regime are also subject to this landing restriction which is a temporary measure necessary for the protection of human and animal health.Jamaican citizens and residents, who have travelled to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone within 28 days of their arrival to Jamaica, will be quarantined in the interest of public health and national security upon their arrival in Jamaica. This applies equally to any person having a right of entry pursuant to Jamaica’s obligations under international organization head quarters agreements.The general public is advised that the Government of Jamaica reserves the right to screen all Jamaican nationals.According to the World Health Organization the present Ebola outbreak is the largest and most complex since the discovery of the disease in 1976; hence this decision has been made against the background of the outbreak in West Africa since March 2014, and its continued increasing threat to world health and security of Jamaican citizens.The categories of persons named in the ban represent a ban on persons who have traveled to or transited through countries which the World Health Organization has acknowledged as having the most severe outbreaks and pose the most severe imminent risk for the continued spread of the disease.Jamaica’s response is informed by the World Health Organization guidance for control of outbreaks which are provided for in:Ebola and Marburg virus disease epidemics: preparedness, alert, control, and evaluation, and Interim Infection Prevention and Control Guidance for Care of Patients with Suspected or Confirmed Filovirus Haemorrhagic Fever in Health-Care Settings, with Focus on EbolaThe travel ban has been made pursuant to Section 6 of the Aliens Act and Section 4 of  the Immigration Restriction  (Commonwealth Citizens) Act, which provides the criteria for the eligibility for admission of aliens to Jamaica and prohibited immigrants respectively.Having regard to the threat posed by the Ebola disease, the category of travelers designated in the ban are hereby not permitted to land in Jamaica.In the meantime, the Jamaican government is confirming that an American man who arrived in the island from the United States yesterday and who had travelled to Liberia two weeks prior has departed Jamaica for the United States. Upon arrival the proper protocols regarding screening procedures were followed by immigration officers.On his arrival yesterday, the visitor was examined by officials from the Ministry of Health and was found not to be exhibiting any symptoms of the Ebola virus.The Jamaican Government acknowledges the serious threat of the Ebola virus and has taken these measures in the interest of countering the threat to public health and national security. Advertisementslast_img read more