Worth the wait: Folayang cops ONE lightweight title, stops Aoki

first_imgGolden moment for Eduard Folayang. Photo from ONE ChampionshipSINGAPORE—Eduard Folayang dropped to his knees then sprung back to his feet. He raised his hands in the air then was mobbed as he made his victory lap in the cage.For years, Folayang had been patiently for his time and he finally had his moment Friday night.ADVERTISEMENT We are young Hot Blue Eagles Folayang was ready from the get-go. He was taken down several times in the first two rounds and managed to get back up on his feet, already an achievement by itself considering Aoki’s mastery of the ground.READ: Fighters face off ahead of stacked ONE fight card in SingaporeFolayang’s golden moment #ONEFightNight pic.twitter.com/nLPNE10gaM— Mark Giongco (@MarkGiongcoINQ) November 11, 2016But as the fight went on, Folayang’s confidence grew. He flashed a huge grin in the middle of the second round then landed definitive blows to the body in an array of punches and kicks.So much have been said about Aoki’s ground game and how Folayang wouldn’t last long on his back.But it turned out to be the other way around. Folayang’s striking power was too much.READ: Folayang eyes ‘legend’ status vs AokiGold and silver confetti filled the air and finally—after a long and painful wait—Folayang had a gold belt shining around his waist. EDITORS’ PICK Folayang not only won his first world title by seizing the ONE lightweight belt, he did it in the most spectacular way after turning who had been deemed an indestructible legend in Shinya Aoki to a mere mortal.“I’m overwhelmed and really happy. I can’t explain it but I just looked up and said, ‘God really fulfills promises,’” an overjoyed Folayang, who was still in disbelief, said in Filipino. “Sometimes we rush but there are going to be upsets in life and we can’t turn our backs once we’re in those situations, so I learned my lesson in a different way [and it’s] a good story.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“Shinya is a vey strong ground fighter. I just really prepared well for this fight.”It was a crushing knee that made a snapping sound as it hit Aoki straight in the face that started the end for the fearsome Japanese star. Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PH among economies most vulnerable to virus READ: ONE: Folayang primed for ‘make or break’ fight vs AokiThe conclusion came just 41 seconds into the third round with Folayang hammering Aoki with everything he’s got, leaving his opponent stunned and pressed against the cage.“I already saw he’s very open to get caught with that knee,” Folayang recalled. It took Folayang five years to get a title shot and everyone around him—from his coach to stablemates—knew he wasn’t going to pass up a chance to come home a world champion.ADVERTISEMENT Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more

Trase.earth tracks commodities, links supply chains to deforestation risk

first_imgLaunched in 2016, Trase is an innovative Internet tool, available to anyone, which tracks commodities supply chains in detail from source to market, and can also connect those chains to environmental harm, including deforestation. Until the advent of Trase, knowledge of supply chains was sketchy and difficult to obtain.The Trase Yearbook 2018 is the first in an annual series of reports on countries and companies trading in such commodities as soy, sugarcane and maize, which also assesses the deforestation risk associated with those crops, making it a vital tool for environmentalists, governments, investors and other interested parties.The Yearbook shows that in 2016 the Brazilian soy supply chain was dominated by just six key players – Bunge, Cargill, ADM, COFCO, Louis Dreyfus and Amaggi – accounting for 57 percent of soy exported. In the past ten years, these six firms were also associated with more than 65 percent of the total deforestation in Brazil.Trase shows that zero-deforestation commitments (ZDCs) have so far not resulted in greatly reduced deforestation risk for the commodities companies and countries making them. Between 2006 and 2016, soy traders with ZDCs, as compared to non-committed firms, were associated with similar levels of deforestation risk. Aerial view of new Cerrado forest clearing. Roughly half the deforestation occurring in the Cerrado is legal, say analysts, highlighting the need for legislation to protect this biome – important for its biodiversity, aquifers and carbon storage. Image by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayA handful of companies account for half of South American exports of major commodities – including soy, palm oil, cane sugar and cocoa – according to a new report by the Stockholm Environment Institute and Global Canopy. Soy production has expanded rapidly in Brazil, where exports are dominated by just six companies, with the majority of those exports feeding the ever-expanding Chinese demand for the oily bean.The Trase Yearbook 2018 is the first in an annual series of reports tracking countries and companies involved in the trade of commodities such as soy, sugarcane, and maize, and assessing the deforestation risk associated with those crops, using data collated as part of the Transparency for Sustainable Economies (Trase) platform.While the report itself is making news, so is Trase – a relatively new tool developed jointly by international non-profit organization (NGO) Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) and Global Canopy to improve transparency in supply chains globally. Until the advent of Trase, the tracking of commodities by investors, environmentalists, economists, journalists, consumers and other interested parties was largely hit and miss. With Trase a commodities supply chain can often be identified with a couple mouse clicks.Linking commodities to deforestationSignificantly, Trase offers “the first [ever] systematic accounting of the total deforestation risk associated with downstream buyers [for a particular] commodity that’s driving deforestation,” says Toby Gardner, Senior Research Fellow at SEI who heads the new platform.Prior to Trase, publicly available data on supply chains was limited to national-level statistics, allowing only crude analyses that often failed to identify the companies involved.“Trase has made an enormous contribution to increase transparency in value chains and more specifically in soy in Brazil,” says Luis Fernando Guedes Pinto, Manager of Agricultural Certification at Imaflora, an NGO based in São Paulo, Brazil. “It is a revolutionary and useful tool for all actors involved in the trade of commodities.”Trase was launched in 2016 and uses market research data on key commodities such as soy to track supply chains from the municipalities where the crops are produced, all the way to their international export.Gardner hopes that the projects’ online visualizations and open-access data will “simplify what is an immensely complex picture into a very simple message,” for governments, companies, environmental NGOs and activists to act upon.Cerrado soy feeds a booming global soy protein market. The Trase 2018 Yearbook tracks the Brazilian soy supply chain in detail, from producers to export. Image by Flávia MilhoranceThe challenge of tracing soy Soy production has expanded rapidly in South America in the last decade to meet growing market demand in Europe and Asia, largely for use as animal feed. Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay now provide almost half the world’s soy, up from just 3 percent in 1975. Brazil is expected to overtake the United States as the world’s largest soybean producer this year, with Brazil expected to produce 117 million tons.Commodities like soy are challenging to trace thoroughly along an entire supply chain because beans from many farms are typically trucked, bulked and aggregated at large centralized storage and sorting facilities. “There is no such thing as traceability of a [single] soy bean,” says Gardner. For this reason, even commodities companies themselves often do not have full knowledge of their own supply chain sources.To overcome this deficiency, Trase stiches together multiple datasets to identify “the most likely supply chain connections between a particular buyer and a particular landscape of production,” says Gardner. This estimation allows for the identification of landscape level effects, such as deforestation, which can then be more accurately allocated to specific traders.Pinto warns that the strength of any particular Trase analysis depends on the availability of data. Gardner agrees, noting that Trase has performed particularly well for Brazil, where detailed data purchased from private market research companies could be combined with freely available data in government repositories and self-declared by companies.As Trase expands its detailed analyses to other countries and commodities, analysts are encountering less complete datasets. Supply chains, they note, are more difficult to trace when commodities are exported not as raw crops, but as processed products. Argentina, for example, exports 80 percent of its soy as soy cake or oil.“I think a lot of people would be shocked [to learn] that the accessibility of many of the datasets we use was much greater in Brazil than for many European Union countries,” Gardner says. In the EU, import and customs data for individual shipments is not available in the public domain.Tracking the global soy trade Although more than 1,000 companies exported soy from Brazil between 2005 and 2016, only a handful have commanded a significant share of the market. The Trase data shows that in 2016 it was dominated by just six key players – Bunge, Cargill, ADM, COFCO, Louis Dreyfus and Amaggi – which together accounted for 57 percent of soy exported. Over the last decade, these six companies have also been associated with more than 65 percent of the total deforestation in Brazil. None of the six companies responded to Mongabay’s requests for comment.The dominance of so few very large companies “helps in pinpointing and targeting where the action is needed,” says Gardner, but “you’re dealing with a small number of incredibly powerful players,” which are unlikely to improve sustainability in their supply chains without governmental pressure and/or consumer willingness to pay a premium for that sustainability.However, knowing the six principal soy traders linked to the bulk of deforestation could aid environmental NGOs in better targeting their campaigns as they try to implement a voluntary Soy Manifesto in Brazil’s Cerrado biome and maintain the Amazon Soy Moratorium.One of the largest drivers of soy expansion across South America has been demand from China, with exports increasing 300 percent in the last decade, the Yearbook reports. China has increased their imports of Brazilian soy at the expense of exports from the U.S., Pinto says, which could have major ramifications for the future of sustainability in soy production. President Trump’s trade war with China could exacerbate shifts in soy trade patterns from the U.S. to Brazil. “We do not know the risks and sustainability consequences of these market battles,” says Pinto.However, analysts do estimate that half of the total deforestation risk in Brazil during 2016 came as a result of soy exported to China. In addition, although the EU imports a smaller volume of soy from Brazil, its trade imposes a relatively higher level of deforestation risk per hectare harvested when compared to China, because a greater percentage of EU imported soy comes from regions of high deforestation risk.Soy production was historically seen as a major threat to the Amazon rainforest. However, largely thanks to the success of the Amazon Soy Moratorium, most soy production and soy-associated deforestation now occurs outside the Amazon rainforest, particularly in the Cerrado savannah biome, which lies east and south of the Amazon basin.“The Cerrado is the biggest frontier of soy expansion in the world,” says Gardner.Spotlight on the CerradoThe voluntary Amazon Soy Moratorium – negotiated between the soy industry, the Brazilian government and civil society organizations led by Greenpeace – originated in 2006. The traders pledged not to purchase soy grown on land in the Brazilian Amazon deforested after July 2006. Although the moratorium has been criticized for driving agricultural expansion into less well-protected habitats, such as the Cerrado, Gardner says that this was probably a geographical shift that was already in motion when the Moratorium was devised.“It was really no skin off the industry’s nose to sign the soy moratorium because the Cerrado is a much better place to expand soy anyway,” as the land there is typically flatter and more suited to mechanized industrial agribusiness practices, and with better infrastructure.Brazil’s latest agricultural frontier is centered in Matopiba, a portion of the Cerrado covering 730,000 square kilometers (281 855 square miles), and spread across 337 municipalities in the neighboring Brazilian states of Maranhão, Tocantins, Piauí and Bahia. Over 75 percent of Cerrado native vegetation cleared between 2006 and 2016 was in the Matopiba region, with soy production there soaring by 310 percent between 2001 and 2017. The reason for the rapid expansion is profit: the Matopiba soy crop boasted an estimated value of R $20 billion (US $5.3 billion) in 2015.While Cerrado soy expansion has been linked to higher incomes and reduced poverty and illiteracy, the region has also experienced a rise in child mortality, increased conflicts between agribusiness and traditional communities over water and land, and an exodus of rural people to urban slums seeking jobs.It is more challenging to assess and track deforestation in the Cerrado, which unlike the Amazon, is made up of a patchwork of dense vegetation and savannah. However, Trase estimates that in the Brazilian Cerrado, 20 percent of the total area in soy production in 2015 was covered in native vegetation as of the year 2000. Roughly half the deforestation occurring in the Cerrado is legal, say analysts, highlighting the need for legislation to protect this important ecosystem.Protecting the Cerrado is “fundamental not only for [limiting] greenhouse gas emissions, but for water and biodiversity conservation,” says Pinto.A protest by the Rainforest Action Network against Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), Bunge and Cargill at the Chicago Board of Trade. Despite Zero Deforestation Commitments made by transnational commodities companies, critics say that major traders have not done near enough to eliminate deforestation from their soy supply chains. Photo credit: Rainforest Action Network on Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NCDeforestation commitments vs. ground truthingCommodity trader commitments to reduce deforestation in recent years indicate an increased awareness by companies of the need to improve supply chain sustainability.Five major traders – Bunge, Cargill, ADM, Amaggi, and Louis Dreyfus (LDC) – have now made commitments to eliminate deforestation from their supply chains according to Gardner, with soy giant LDC the most recent to do so. In addition, large fines imposed by the Brazilian government on commodities traders guilty of buying from soy producers causing Cerrado deforestation could be a game changer.However, the regional distribution of these commitments has been very uneven. For example, less than half of soy exported from the Cerrado biome in 2016 was covered by a zero-deforestation commitment (ZDC). The Cerrado Manifesto, which was developed by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and Greenpeace in 2017 and calls for voluntarily pledges to stop clearing Cerrado native vegetation, has received more than 70 signatories so far, but none have come from major soy traders.Also, these voluntary declarations to remove soy from company supply chains are far from being effectively implemented on the ground. So far, zero-deforestation commitments have not manifested in substantially reduced deforestation risk for those companies and countries that have made them. Between 2006 and 2016, soy traders with ZDCs were associated with similar levels of deforestation risk as compared to non-committed companies, according to the Yearbook.“It’s not yet the case that those companies that have made commitments are showing much lower levels of deforestation risk,” reports Gardner.Similarly at the national level, EU countries that are signatories to the 2015 Amsterdam Declaration, which aims to eliminate deforestation from agricultural supply chains, are associated with similar levels of deforestation risk as other EU nations.Trase hopes to provide a baseline to track future progress towards ZDCs and other sustainability commitments to evaluate whether these strategies are effective.New legislation, such as France’s Duty of Vigilance Law, shows the role importing governments can play. Implemented in 2017, the law requires companies with more than 5,000 employees to evaluate the social and environmental impacts of their supply chains around the world. “That’s unprecedented for a country to impose that requirement on its private sector,” says Gardner.Pinto points out that existing definitions of sustainability also come up short. “Many companies, and even a few NGOs, consider deforestation-free soy as sustainable. This is a terrible mistake and a bad message for society,” he says. While the soy moratorium prohibits deforestation in the Amazon biome, as well as child labor and slave labor, he explains “sustainable soy would be linked not only to avoiding bad practices, but [also to implementing] good social, agronomic and environmental practices.”Enhancing commodities trading transparencyGardner sees a combination of government action, NGO campaign pressure and consumer choice as paving the way to increased transparency and sustainability, with Trase providing an accessible way for stakeholders to understand and explore commodity supply chains, and measure progress.“We can now see in simple graphics the volume of soy traded either by company, municipality or country importer,” says Pinto. “This level of transparency allows governments, NGOs, retailers and the financial sector to have a wide and comprehensive understanding of the global trade flow.”Significantly, there is no real need to continue deforestation in Brazil in order to meet the growing demand for commodities like soy, sources told Mongabay. According to report published in March by MightyEarth, and NGO, 650 million hectares (2.5 million square miles) of previously cleared land in Latin America could be used to grow soy.Gardner explains: “It’s not necessarily that the brakes need to be put on soy production. [Instead] the growth of the industry needs to be directed to areas that have already been cleared and degraded.” However, the current political climate in Brazil encourages more deforestation, not less. “Clearing forest and land is cheaper and makes more sense [under current federal policies] than converting pasture to crops,” says Pinto.Through a concerted effort – by turning degraded pasturelands to croplands, and by adopting improved productivity techniques – Brazil could satisfy global demand for soy without cutting down a single tree.Soy is ubiquitous in thousands of products, with consumer demand driving soaring soy expansion in the Brazilian Cerrado, leading to a dramatic loss of native vegetation there. Most consumers have little awareness of what products contain soy, no less the tropical deforestation its production is causing. Photo on Visual HuntClarification: This article was updated to note that Trase is a partnership between the Stockholm Environment Institute and Global Canopy.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Soy, Conservation Technology, Controversial, Corporate Social Responsibility, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Global Trade, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Supply Chain, Technology, Threats To The Amazon, Trade, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Wildtech last_img read more

Indigenous peoples denounce ongoing land rights violations in Ecuador

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Forest People, Forests, Governance, Government, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Indigenous leaders in Ecuador say that a lack of progress toward addressing key issues stands in the way of their fundamental territorial rights.Concerns include resource extraction projects initiated without proper prior consent and consultation, as well as the activation of several mining and oil concessions in Ecuador.The outcry comes at a time when indigenous peoples are increasingly being recognized as key partners in ensuring the protection of the world’s tropical forests. Indigenous people in Ecuador say their territorial rights are being systematically violated, according to a top United Nations official. Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the U.N.’s special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, is urging the Ecuadoran government to form a “truly plurinational and multicultural society” in accordance with its constitution and international law.Indigenous leaders cite a lack of progress toward addressing key problems impeding their fundamental rights, according to Tauli-Corpuz. That includes a lack of free and informed prior consent before implementing resource extraction projects. The leaders are also concerned about the activation of several mining and oil concessions.While Tauli-Corpuz has praised the current Ecuadoran government for advancing constructive dialogues with indigenous people over territorial rights, she criticized it for maintaining a status quo established by predecessors that failed to recognize, respect or protect the fundamental rights of indigenous communities.“The future of Ecuador’s indigenous people as well as the country’s forest ecosystems are at stake,” Tauli-Corpuz said in an interview with Mongabay. “The government has eliminated the autonomous institutions within the state that represented indigenous people, which means the national development plan is being developed without meaningful participation on the part of the indigenous.”During a recent trip to Ecuador, Tauli-Corpuz met with the country’s top officials, including President Lenín Moreno, high-ranking ministers, and representatives from the legislative and judicial bodies.Indigenous women march in Puyo, Ecuador on March 8, 2018. Photo by Kimberley Brown/Mongabay.The former president, Rafael Correa, borrowed billions of dollars from China to pursue his national development agenda from 2007 to 2017. That left Moreno with a massive budget deficit when he took office last year. To close the deficit, Ecuador signed contracts worth $1.6 billion in October to increase oil production at sites in the northeastern Amazon basin. The country is expected to increase metal mining investment from $1.1 billion this year to $7.9 billion in 2021, according to a BMI Research report.“The government feels that the country is in an economic crisis with high debt,” Tauli-Corpuz said. “Therefore they’re pushing economic ventures to raise revenue to pay off their foreign debt.”On her trip, Tauli-Corpuz reviewed a report put together by indigenous leaders that covered five emblematic cases in the Amazon Basin involving Chinese capital and investment. The extractive projects and infrastructure covered in the report were carried out without adequate human rights protection of indigenous peoples in countries such as Venezuela, Ecuador, Colombia, Peru and Brazil, creating concerns over China’s rising influence in the region.Mining and oil threatsAfter visiting several indigenous territories around the country, Tauli-Corpuz said mining and oil extraction were the main threats to indigenous peoples, although agribusiness expansion and large-scale infrastructure projects also endangered their communities.She cited the case of an older woman she met from an indigenous community, who told her she had been given just five minutes to clear out after being notified of her family’s eviction. Her home was bulldozed before she could get her children to come help her move her belongings, Tauli-Corpuz said.“When the military and police arrive, the indigenous people are subjected to inhuman treatment as they are forced to leave land they have lived in for time immemorial,” she added.Deforestation in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Photo by Jeremy HanceAlthough the security situation for indigenous communities has reportedly improved slightly in recent years, Tauli-Corpuz said indigenous peoples had complained to her about armed groups threatening and even assassinating land rights defenders with impunity for standing up to extractive industries such as gold mining. She pointed to the example of indigenous leader José Tendetza, a prominent critic of the Mirador gold mine operating on Shuar indigenous territory. His battered body was found floating in a river in 2014 and showed signs of him having been tortured and beaten.“The perpetrators of that crime have never been brought to justice,” Tauli-Corpuz said.Indigenous peoples have also demanded amnesty for land rights defenders held by the state after opposing extraction projects in their territories, Tauli-Corpuz said. Seven pardons and one amnesty have been granted to indigenous human rights defenders to date, and the government is considering a simplified process to grant 137 additional pending petitions.Tauli-Corpuz called on the government to meet its commitments under its own 2008 constitution to fully recognize and implement “indigenous peoples’ rights in accordance with international human rights law.”“Protection of rights of nature cannot be achieved without protection of stewards,” she said.Indigenous land rights and climate changeA report released in November showed that countries are not on target to meet the 2020 goal of the New York Declaration on Forests (NYDF), which aims to halve global deforestation by 2020 and eliminate deforestation by 2030. The average annual rate of natural forest loss is 42 percent higher than in the previous decade.According to the latest NYDF Goal 10 report, co-authored by the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI), studies have shown territories where indigenous rights are legally recognized have lower rates of deforestation than lands beyond their borders.The Goal 10 report pointed to a study released this year that found that between 2000 and 2012, rates of deforestation inside legally recognized indigenous communities in the Brazilian Amazon were seven times lower than in lands beyond these borders. In the Colombian Amazon, the rates were three times lower.Global forest programs such as REDD, or reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, have yet to invest substantially in the protection of land rights for indigenous communities, according to RRI spokesman Andy White. The REDD program was first negotiated under the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2005.“The problem was that the REDD program was first developed by ministries of environment in Europe,” White said. “From there, REDD mostly went to work with the ministries of environment in the tropical countries but it hasn’t really dealt with land rights as of yet.”White said protecting and restoring the world’s forests could produce natural solutions to climate change impacts, and would go over 30 percent of the way to achieving the cost-effective mitigation necessary to bring down runaway carbon emissions.“In a world where it has become a global priority to protect global forests, research shows that indigenous people do a better job at protecting forests than governments do,” he said. “We aren’t going be able to solve the climate change problem without protecting indigenous rights.”Multiple attempts to reach Ecuador’s Ministry of Energy and Non-Renewable Resources for comment by email and telephone before publication were unsuccessful.Banner image: Indigenous women march in Puyo, Ecuador on March 8, 2018. Photo by Kimberley Brown for Mongabay.Editor’s note: A previous version of this article noted that the battered body of José Tendetza, a prominent critic of the Mirador gold mine operating on Shuar indigenous territory, was found in an unmarked grave in 2014. Tendetza’s body was found floating in a river and showed signs of torture and beating. Mongabay regrets the error.  center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Rare rhino’s death should light a fire under Indonesia (commentary)

first_imgTam died on Monday, likely from old age, after living in captivity for 11 years.Tam never bred in captivity despite repeated attempts with captive females.Tam represented hope when he was captured – today he represents the need to move aggressively on measures to save his species.This post is part of “Saving Life on Earth: Words on the Wild,” a monthly column by Jeremy Hance, one of Mongabay’s original staff writers. On May 27, Monday morning, I woke to the news that Tam, the last male Sumatran rhino in Malaysia and the last known male Bornean rhino, had perished. As clichéd as it sounds, I felt like I’d been punched.It was not surprising news. Tam’s health had been in decline for months and reports had gotten direr in the last week. He was old for a rhino, in his mid-30s, and was suffering from kidney and liver damage. It was, put simply, his time.But Tam was special — to the world and, selfishly, to me. I had the honor of meeting him in 2009. I was a young environmental journalist then, with just a year under my belt, writing for Mongabay. I was in Sabah, in Malaysian Borneo, for a colloquium on orangutans and palm oil, but I made a long detour (flying over oil palm plantations, sprawling towns and rainforest patches) to the Tabin Wildlife Reserve for a single reason: Kertam, or just Tam for short.Tam in his forest home in Sabah in 2009, one year after his capture. Photo by Jeremy HanceJust a year before my visit, Tam had stumbled into an oil palm plantation, one of many that had spread across Sabah in the 2000s. He would live for the next 11 years at the Bornean Rhino Alliance (BORA) facility at Tabin, receiving around-the-clock protection and a large pen of the rainforest habitat his species had evolved with over millions of years.My meeting with Tam would be fortuitous in my life. Our few hours together would kick-start my devoted obsession to the Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) and the writing of more words than I can count on this species.Despite untold efforts, Tam never produced children. Yet perhaps we can take at least one lesson from Tam’s life and death: time is running out for the Sumatran rhino. The much-welcomed new program, Sumatran Rhino Rescue, must move faster and be willing to take more risks than past efforts if we are to have any chance of success in conserving the species.Indonesia, with its intransigence on cooperating with Malaysia and its historic tepidness over taking more drastic actions, has kicked this can down the road for long enough. Now is our last, best chance to save the species.Light a fire under IndonesiaThe situation is this: we now have nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity — one in Malaysian Borneo, one in Indonesian Borneo, or Kalimantan, and seven in Sumatra. But only one pair of rhinos, in Sumatra, have so far been proven capable of reproduction, and two of the females, Iman and Pahu, are an island apart from the others.Meanwhile, in the wild, the Sumatran rhino is on the precipice of extinction. In 2017, I wrote a series on the species that, based on numerous conversations with experts, put the number of Sumatran rhinos left at just 30 to 80. And these populations are separated over four distinct habitats — one of which may already be devoid of rhinos.Male Sumatran rhino named Jackson of the northern subspecies, Dicerorhinus sumatrensis lasiotis, at the London Zoo in the early Twentieth Century. This subspecies used to roam mainland Asia as far as India and Bangladesh. It is now extinct. Two subspecies remain: the Bornean and the Sumatran.Given this, our best chance for the species is now to build a sustainable captive population to ensure survival — and to do that we desperately need at least a few new young, healthy males and females. This would mean, like the European bison or the California condor, that if the species vanishes from the wild, it could be reintroduced back into the jungle one happier day.Today, there are only seven animals at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas (most of them directly related), and we haven’t seen a birth for three years. The sanctuary requires the influx of new animals with divergent genetics – and his will require embracing risk. Capturing a rhino is by no means easy and sometimes things go wrong. Sometimes a capture ends in death, as the demise of a young female, Najaq, proved in 2016 – and a number of other animals in the 1980s and 90s.  This doesn’t mean a mortality at capture is acceptable or that we shouldn’t learn from our mistakes – only that, while we must do what we can to avoid injury or death, we must accept this is a risky business. But so is leaving the rhinos where they are.Tam’s epitaph is clear: We no longer have the luxury of time or easy decisions.For decades, conservationists counted and estimated Sumatran rhinos for decades with little success — and in all cases overestimating the number of the animals. This has happened in every place the Sumatran rhino has been counted: from Peninsular Malaysia (now extinct) to Sabah (now extinct in the wild) to Kalimantan (where estimates of 15 animals are almost certainly overoptimistic) to a number of large parks in Sumatra, where reputed rhinos were just ghosts.This problem is likely due to the fact that tapir footprints look like those of Sumatran rhinos, and when anyone, even well-trained rangers, goes looking for a specific species, it’s often easy to find something — anything — that could be taken as a sign. But a “sign” doesn’t mean there’s actually a rhino. Camera traps are the best tools to actually verify rhinos and then monitor them for capture.Today, we need to skip trying to count and instead capture. If and when rhinos are confirmed in potential populations (aside from the Leuser Ecosystem in northern Sumatra) a capture program should be initiated immediately, especially if the rhinos appear to be in good breeding health. History has shown it can take years to successfully capture a single animal.Tam under general anaesthesia undergoing the electro-ejaculation procedure in Malaysian Borneo to collect sperm, which is today frozen for potential use. From left to right : Zainal Zainuddin, Willson Kuntil (senior rhino keeper), (green shirt not acing camera) Dr Abdul Hamid Ahman (BORA chairman; performing manual stimulation ), (colorful shirt) Abraham Mathew (senior veterinarian, Singapore Zoo) and Zubaidah Kamarudin (Department of Willdife and National Parks, Peninsular Malaysia, PERHILITAN) jointly responsible for anaesthesia and monitoring of vital parameters. Image courtesy of BORA.There may already be zero animals left in Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park in Sumatra, and if there are any, it’s very likely not a viable population. If any rhinos are confirmed there, captures should begin immediately. Kalimantan could still house around a dozen animals, officials say, but again that’s hardly a viable population in the long term. Moreover, left in the wild, those animals could easily fall prey to poaching or snaring (numerous captured rhinos, for example, have had evidence of snare wounds). Captures, here too, shouldn’t wait.Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra could be slightly better off in terms of population, but only slightly. And even if Way Kambas has, let’s say, a population of 30-plus rhinos that are breeding (the most optimistic estimate I’ve heard), it’s important to take the risk of capturing a few animals here for captivity now. Way Kambas is also more likely to have young, healthier animals than either Bukit Barisan or Kalimantan.The biggest question mark is Leuser. Here, I can understand taking things a little slower. For one thing, Leuser may be our best chance of a viable wild population. For another, successfully capturing rhinos there will be more difficult due to its remoteness and difficult terrain. Leuser can wait — if rhinos are found elsewhere.Even if the total Sumatran rhino population is larger than we expect (highly unlikely unless Leuser holds some surprises), the species is still in perilous decline. The Sumatran rhino has suffered the same fate everywhere: deaths have outweighed births, and the population has slowly, but inevitably, fallen to zero. Females that don’t reproduce regularly soon develop tumors and may become unable to reproduce at all. Rhinos that are not captured now face the risk of a life of poaching, snares, and possible childlessness.The rhinos of BorneoThe death of Tam is about so much more than one individual. Tam is the last known male rhino of the Bornean subspecies (D. s. harrissoni). If no new males are found in Indonesian Borneo, then his death could well represent the extinction of a subspecies that split off some 300,000 years ago from the population on Sumatra. The Bornean rhino, the smallest on Earth, contains genetics and morphology distinct from any other.There are two known chances, though, of preserving at least some of this subspecies’ distinct genetics: Pahu and Iman, the last two remaining Bornean rhinos in captivity — but both female. Sadly, Iman is in perilous health and will likely never bear children, but she’s still producing viable eggs. Those eggs should be utilized: whether they are sent to Indonesia or sperm from Indonesia is sent to Sabah (as has been long requested) no longer matters. What matters is that it gets done and fast.Iman is now one of two remaining captive Sumatran rhinos in Borneo. A tumor in her uterus ruptured in 2017. Scientists don’t believe she can carry a baby to term, but her eggs could still be utilized. Photo courtesy of Sabah Wildlife Department.Tam’s sperm has also been preserved and could be used to attempt to impregnate Pahu, in Indonesian Borneo, or any of the female rhinos in Sumatra. But all of this depends on Malaysia and Indonesia working together — something they have failed to do over the last several decades, essentially dooming a number of opportunities to produce more babies. The Sumatran rhino has already suffered enough lost chances due to bureaucratic squabbling between the two countries.These animals’ eggs and sperm are tools we can employ to increase the chance of more births. And while Indonesia has long been reluctant to employ such methods, it’s time to start using all the tools in our possession.In the meantime, Pahu should be sent to the captive breeding facility in Sumatra and not wait for a male to be found in Kalimantan. If a male is found in Kalimantan — a really big if — it might take years to successfully capture him. If it’s not possible to send her, attempts should be made to artificially inseminate her with Tam’s or another male’s preserved sperm.Estimated to be around 25 years old, Pahu is no spring chicken in rhino years; her breeding chances may already be slim. We need to try breeding Pahu now if her Bornean genetics are to be preserved and if she’s to prove useful to the species.In 2012, stakeholders agreed to mix the Bornean and Sumatran subspecies in order to produce more rhinos. But seven years later, not one attempt has been made. Neither Tam or his sperm were ever sent to Sumatra where reproduction could have been attempted.Tam represents lost chances; Pahu should not.If later a Bornean male is captured, breeding can still be attempted.But let’s stop assuming the best-case scenario. Let’s assume the worst and act accordingly.My gentlemanAll day, I’ve been thinking back to my visit to Tabin to meet Tam, 10 years ago. Before I met him, Cynthia Ong, the head of local NGO Leap, had told me Tam was “very manja,” which meant sweet, cuddly, or lovingly spoiled. She compared him to an attention-needy house cat.I had a hard time imagining any rhino as such.But when I was brought to his pen, where he awaited lunch, he was so manja. He squeaked at me like a dolphin, sniffed me curiously, and nearly crushed my camera against the bars as he tried to rub against me. Although technically the Bornean rhino is the world’s smallest, Tam was still huge.Tam in 2009. Photo by Jeremy Hance.Last year, veterinarian Zainal Zahari Zainuddin described Tam to me as “a perfect gentleman” and told me the story of how a fly once got the better of Tam.Just before breakfast, one morning, Tam noticed a biting fly in his stall. In an attempt to dislodge it, he sent a spray of urine at the little insect and then waited outside a few minutes before entering his stall. But as the gentleman rhino walked inside, he noticed the urine had not deterred the fly: it was buzzing around. So the 620-kilogram (1,370-pound) megafauna ran away and hid in the forest.Tam was several hours late for breakfast that day.“That’s him … a proud big fellow, but scared of these biting flies,” Zainuddin laughed at the time.Tam wasn’t just a member of an endangered species or subspecies. He was an individual with his own personality. And his loss is a sad day for Sabah and the world. It’s also a warning.When I met Tam in 2009, experts said there were probably around 250 Sumatran rhinos left in the wild. They were wrong. They also said that Sabah might be home to 40 animals — also wrong.Let’s not spend another decade squabbling while the remaining animals disappear. Let’s do something. Let’s stop with the missed opportunities and shrugged-off chances. Let’s put aside national differences and egos and work together. Let’s act for Tam. While he never had children, it doesn’t mean he can’t have a legacy. Article published by Jeremy Hance Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Le Tour: Australian Whitfield weathers rain to win 2nd stage

first_imgMarcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite MOST READ With today’s 177.35km third stage going to Daet, Camarines Sur, largely flat, Whitehouse is expected to keep the yellow shirt until the final stage on Tuesday.“Like I’ve said, I’ll just take it one stage at a time,’’ said Whitehouse, whose family is now based in Christchurch, New Zealand. “’We’ll see what happens tomorrow (today).”Grijalba remained fourth and Crawford lay fifth, each of them two minutes behind Whitehouse in the four-day race backed by Petron, UPS, Philippine Airlines, Advanced Solutions Inc., Cargohaus Inc., CCN Sports Philippines, IWMI, NMM Customs Broker, Phenom Sportswear, UFL Philippines and WARM.Overall, Team Ukyo’s Eiichi Hirai stayed at sixth, Nathan Erle was seventh, Guardiola lay at eighth, 2015 champ Thomas Lebas at ninth and Edgar Nieto of 7Eleven-Road Bike Philippines, all of them 2:04 back.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Municipal councilor nabbed for indiscriminate firing in Leyte Palace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member The overall general classification leader checked in 20th in the stage made difficult by a long punishing climb on the seaside town of Tiwi.“The hard part began when we hit the coast and the roads started to go up and down,” said Whitehouse. “The rain and the wind plus the climb blew us apart.”Jai Crawford of Kinan Cycling Team made a bold solo breakaway approaching the climb halfway through the course and conquered the only king of the mountain challenge of the day.But Crawford’s gambit to take the stage by his lonesome didn’t pay off as the Australian was reeled in by the chase pack featuring Whitehouse after the second intermediate sprint in Tigaon town, some 30 km from the finish.The top of the standings hardly moved with Whitehouse leading Stage 2 second-placer Benjamin Hill of Attaque Team Gusto by 1:57 and Ryu Suzuki of Bridgestone Anchor Cycling Team by 1:58.ADVERTISEMENT “It makes life harder if I have to watch 10 riders who are capable of making an attack,” said the 22-year climb specialist from Manchester, England. “The other challengers were always attacking me. Thankfully, no time was lost today.”Whitehouse, who prevailed in the opening lap from Legaspi to Sorsogon City to seize the overall leader’s yellow shirt, managed to arrive at the finish with a big bunch of riders led by Stage 2 winner Sean Whitfield of Oliver’s Real Food Racing.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnWhitfield led a tight sprint to the line and nosed out Sanghong Park of LX Cycling Team to complete the 177.35-kilometer trip from Sorsogon City in four hours, 19 minutes and 21 seconds.Fernando Grijalba of Kuwait Caruncho.Es placed third during their mad dash and had the same clocking as Whitfield along with 25 other riders, including Whitehouse. Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member LATEST STORIES 15 Taal towns now under total lockdown Sean Whitfield. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netNAGA CITY—Even the driving rains and the blustery coastal ride won’t distract Daniel Whitehouse from protecting the precious yellow jersey.Riding for Terengganu Cycling Team, Whitehouse simply warded off every challenge on the road to retain the overall lead after the second stage of the 8th Le Tour de Filipinas presented by Air21 on Sunday.ADVERTISEMENT Ronda Pilipinas: Morales edges Hualda, rules Stage 9 Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties 98% of residents in Taal Volcano’s 14-kilometer danger zone evacuated – DILG Poe chides LTFRB exec over termination of motorcycle taxi pilot study View commentslast_img read more

Racal escapes Victoria, moves to joint second place

first_imgAris Dionisio led also-ran Victoria (1-7) with 16 points and 18 rebounds, while Robbie Herndon also got 16 markers and six boards in the losing effort.The Scores:RACAL 75 – Flores 14, Salado 12, Cabrera 10, Torres 9, Mangahas 7, Onwubere 7, Nambatac 4, Terso 4, Apreku 2, Corpuz 2, Dagangon 2, Gumaru 2, Gabawan 0.VICTORIA 70 – Dionisio 16, Herndon 16, Grimaldo 11, Ayonayon 8, Koga 8, Ragasa 4, Nicholls 3, Lao 2, Puspus 2.Quarters: 24-20, 44-36, 62-54, 75-70.ADVERTISEMENT Roider Cabrera also had 10 points and six rebounds for Racal, which tied Cafe France at second place, both carrying an identical 6-1 slate.“We had lots of miscommunications. I told them to not feel too confident because (Victoria) is very deceiving. Luckily, we made stops and we had good rotations in the end game,” said coach Jerry Codinera.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnRacal squandered a nine-point edge, 69-60, with 6:21 remaining and let Victoria grab a 70-69 lead courtesy of a 10-0 spurt.But the Tile Masters held strong on the defensive end, with Flores and Sidney Onwubere making huge plays in the last two minutes as they bounced back from a 77-75 loss to Jose Rizal University last week. FILE – Lervin Flores. PBA IMAGESRacal lost hold of a nine-point lead in the fourth quarter but got its act together in time to escape with a 75-70 victory over Victoria Sports-MLQU Tuesday in the 2017 PBA D-League Aspirants’ Cup at JCSGO Gym in Cubao.Lervin Flores made huge stops in the fourth quarter and finished with 14 points, 11 rebounds, and two blocks, while Kent Salado got 12 markers, 10 boards, and five assists.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next UFC: GSP says won’t stoop down to trash-talking Bisping’s level 2 ‘bookies’ bet collectors held in Quezon Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties View comments MOST READ Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Beggar dead in Quezon hit-and-run incident Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Taal Volcano continues to emit steam, ash from weak explosions Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties LATEST STORIES China counts sharp rise in coronavirus cases, 2 in Beijinglast_img read more

Celtics slump as Millsap lifts Hawks

first_imgAi-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ View comments LATEST STORIES Millsap also got backing from Tim Hardaway Jr with 23 points as well as a career-high 20 points from Taurean Prince and 18 from Dennis Schroder.Boston star Isaiah Thomas led the game scoring with 35 points while Jae Crowder had 24.Elsewhere Thursday, the Washington Wizards claimed a 106-103 win over the New York Knicks to tie for third spot in the East.Washington point guard John Wall warned however that the Wizards would need to improve their defense if they were to prosper in the playoffs.“Our defense is terrible right now,” Wall said. “If we think we’re going to go to the playoffs with this defense, we’ll have an early exit.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Bucks coach Jason Kidd bemoaned his team’s carelessness in possession.“We had way too many turnovers,” Kidd said. “We talked about it before the game, that we’ve got to take care of the ball. If you turn the ball over against Indiana, it puts you in a bad situation defensively, because they are going to take advantage of it, and they did. Once we started turning it over, we were a little hesitant to pass it.” Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Atlanta Hawks forward Taurean Prince (12) looks to pass as Boston Celtics guard Marcus Smart (36) defends in the second half of an NBA basketball game on Thursday, April 6, 2017, in Atlanta. The Hawks won the game 123-116. (AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)Boston’s hopes of pipping Cleveland for top spot in the Eastern Conference suffered a blow on Thursday as the Celtics slumped to defeat against the Atlanta Hawks.The Celtics, comprehensively beaten by the Cavaliers on Wednesday, slid to another costly defeat as Paul Millsap inspired Atlanta to a 123-116 win at Philips Arena in Georgia.ADVERTISEMENT Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos “We have to figure that out,” he added after a win which lifted Washington to 48-31, level with Toronto, who had a rest day on Thursday.Bulls on the chargeMeanwhile, Nikola Mirotic scored 22 points and Jimmy Butler had 19 points as the Chicago Bulls beat the Philadelphia 76ers 102-90 to boost their playoff prospects.Butler also produced 10 rebounds and 10 assists for only the fourth triple-double of his career in what was a fifth win in six games for the Bulls.The Bulls are locked in a neck-and-neck race with Indiana for seventh place in the Eastern Conference, with identical records of 39-40 following the Pacers’ win on Thursday.The Miami Heat (38-40) are also in the hunt, just behind Indiana and Chicago.The Pacers moved to 39-40 after a 104-89 win over the Milwaukee Bucks.Paul George had 23 points and 10 rebounds to subdue the Bucks, who fell to 40-39.Indiana coach Nate McMillan said he was encouraged by the grit shown by his team on their road trip.“We now know exactly what we have to do on this upcoming road trip,” McMillan said. “We were solid on defense tonight, and we did a lot better job attacking. Those are things we have to do. We also did a better job with our spacing tonight.” Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Canadian military mobilized to help Newfoundland dig out SpaceX launches, destroys rocket in astronaut escape test Iran’s 1st international marathon begins, with no Americans Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Presidency bid needs ‘deep reflection’ – Sara Duterte Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely On the edge of America, census begins in a tiny Alaska town Millsap scored 26 points and 12 rebounds as Atlanta improved to 40-38, a half-game ahead of the Milwaukee Bucks in the battle for fifth place.But the defeat put a serious dent in Boston’s chances of overhauling the Cavaliers at the top of the table.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnThe Celtics are now 50-29, lying in second spot behind reigning NBA Finals champions Cleveland who are 51-27 and now primed to lock up first place.Millsap’s points and rebounds total marked a 19th doube-double of the season, and confirmed his successful return from a left knee problem. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Dozens wounded as Iraqi protesters up pressure on governmentlast_img read more

Fowler-Reid among high-powered Sunshine Girls additions

first_imgStar shooter Jhaniele Fowler-Reid is among three players who have been added to the Jamaica Sunshine Girls team to this year’s Fast5 World Series, replacing Sherema Sterling, Shantal Slater, and Zonasha Hinds, who were denied US visas two weeks ago. Former captain Malysha Kelly and veteran player Paula Thompson are the other players who have been brought into the Sunshine Girls team for the tournament, which will be held in Melbourne, Australia , from October 28-29. Fowler-Reid had initially indicated to the Sunshine Girls coaching staff that she would only be available for the Caribbean Netball Championships and not the Fast5 Series as both tournaments would be held in the same month, which would have caused her to miss a number of classes at the Mico University College, where she is currently studying. However, the Caribbean tournament, which was scheduled for October 8-16 in St Lucia, was cancelled last month due to the unavailability of some of the teams, and Fowler-Reid has since indicated her willingness to represent the country in the Fast5 competition. Kelly and Thompson were also members of the squad preparing for the Caribbean Championships and not the Fast5 tournament. Communications director of Netball Jamaica, Wayne Lewis, said the addition of the three players would add a lot of strength and depth to the Sunshine Girls unit, who will be aiming to win the championships for the first time. “I think that with Jhaniele Fowler-Reid in our team, our chances must be better because she is an excellent player,” said Lewis. “She would have been there from the outset if she had made herself available, (but) she decided to play in the Caribbean Championships instead based on her school commitment,” he said. “It augers well for us because they are excellent players and they are very influential players in the team, and they have been around Jamaica’s netball for quite some time, so it can only put us in a much better position in terms of strengthening our team.Our expectations have been heightened going into the tournament,” Lewis added. Lewis also confirmed that Fowler-Reid would captain the Sunshine Girls team at the championships Down Under. “She accepted the challenge of leading the team to the Fast5, and we are very happy about that. She is very respected in the team, very influential, and the players look up to her a great deal, so we are quite happy that she will be there.”last_img read more

Little London’s Samuels focused on getting goals

first_img Other results: Western Bureau: Little London High’s striker Tyreke Samuels who scored a brace in their ISSA/WATA daCosta Cup match against Knockalva Technical yesterday, said whilst happy for the goals he is focused on being their number one striker by scoring goals in every game. Samuels’s goals came in the 29th and 39th minutes. The other scorer for the hosts were Tyrone Reynolds (33rd). Dillon Dixon (77th) got the consolation for Knockalva. “I’m feeling very good knowing that I helped my team get the three points,” said Samuels. “I have not set a target but I am going to continue putting out the effort and work very hard to try and score in every game I play. I was not a regular starter last year or even in the first games of this season but since I got my first start I’ve been improving so now I’m looking to cement that spot,” he added. Jeffery Reece, coach of Little London, was impressed by the performance of his team. “We did a lot of work coming into the match. I realised out of the three strikers Samuels was the one in the best shape. I put him in front of the goal Monday and Tuesday so we were expecting him to score,” said Reece. “Last year, he was supposed to be one of our regular starters but was inconsistent. He didn’t like to train, but this year I pushed him to the extreme to get him in that shape,” he added. “We lost eight of our regular starters from last year, so this is a pretty young team. They are actually gelling together now. A lot of people didn’t expect the team to be where they are now because we lost so many players but they have adapted fast and have more discipline than last year’s team.” Belmont 0 Mannings 4 Hopewell 1 Merlene Ottey 0 Cedric Titus 1 Muschett 0 Cross Keys 0 Winston Jones 1last_img read more

“Clash of the Titans” heading to Berbice in July

first_imgAfter a huge success at the Guyana National Stadium, the promoters of “Clash of the Titans” are now making preparations to have the chutney explosion held in Berbice. It is under the premise that huge support for the show came from the ancient county, hence in all fairness, it be taken there.On July 2, Bath Settlement ground, West Coast Berbice, will come alive as several regional and local artistes are expected to create a whirlwind. The line-up for the show includes Ravi B and the Karma Band, Veekash Sahadeo, Amit Sooknanan, Rick Ramoutar, Venessa Ramoutar as well as Kystal (Party Done).Shakti String Orchestra including Pooran Seeraj, Steven Ramphal and Youland Nedd and the Fire Fest Dancers will also add some spice to the event. Mahendra Ramkellawan will also make an appearance.General admission tickets for the event cost $1500 while VIP tickets will also be available. The event is sponsored by Comfort Sleep, NP Fried Chicken, Team MMR, Crown Vibes and others.The emcee for the show will be television personality, WR Reaz.last_img read more